Cloud Computing and Newton’s third law

  

Issac Newton’s third law of motion famously stated “to every action there is always an equal and opposite reaction”. If one takes a few liberties and applies this to a paradigm shift technology, one could say that every new technology innovation brings about new challenges. 

The benefits of cloud computing are quite exciting.  It enables companies to achieve greater levels of business agility while reducing TCO. It enables companies to transcend the delays associated with internal silos and gain rapid execution of business objectives.  So what’s the downside? 

Proformative recently issued a news release entitled “Economics of Cloud Computing Too Compelling to Ignore” which I thought had some interesting findings including the following:  

  • Cloud Computing and SaaS will be critical to companies over the next few years, and CFOs feel like they are already “behind the curve” and need to be educated,
  • Cloud Computing and SaaS reduce IT CapEx and OpEx and create a direct link between IT consumption and cost, and
  • Cloud Computing and SaaS have delivered to many firms higher ROI, increased collaboration, and greater confidence in systems and their business value.

I get the sense that the survey was focusing more on the public cloud (SaaS) than on the benefits of applying cloud computing principles to datacenters (private cloud). If CFO’s feel behind the curve on cloud computing I wonder how many CIO’s would respond! There’s still a great deal of uncertainty regarding cloud computing (public and private) and a desire for greater education. 

But the point here is in the title — the economics of cloud computing are too compelling to ignore. Without going into detail here (I need to save some material for future posts!) I think its clear that most have recognized that there are profound benefits to cloud computing — even when they aren’t fully understood. So what’s the downside? 

The Dark Side of the cloud

So is cloud computing really a silver bullet for both the business and IT or is there more to it? Mark Shoemaker writes on HP’s Grounded in the Cloud blog:  

If you think you had problems managing the old physical data centers just wait until you try to keep track of the complexity Cloud computing can generate. 

 Mark continues:  

If you were thinking of cloud computing as an easy way of taking all those hairy, non-standard servers you’ve been packing in the data center over the last few years via the wonders of Physical-to-Virtual transformation and shoving them into the cloud, think again. You are still going to need a plan to transform the old stuff but we’ll save that discussion for another time. 

Cloud computing is not a silver bullet if you don’t have strong standardization, lifecycle management, service level management, and change and configuration management. Cloud computing doesn’t solve these problems — it may even make them more important to tackle.   

The original downside to virtualization was VM sprawl and similar problems that come from an unstructured environment can be a barrier to successful cloud computing as well.  

VMware and EMC have recognized this problem and continue to develop products designed to tackle the challenges of cloud computing: 

VMware vCloud Director— VMware Lifecycle manager is being discontinued as vCloud Director attempts lifecycle management and application provisioning from a cloud perspective.  

vCenter Configuration Manager— Automation of guest OS confgurations and patch levels, including PCI compliance from EMC’s Ionix Family). 

vCenter Application Discovery Manager— automated dependency and configuration mapping of applications (from EMC’s Ionix Family)
 
 VMWare Service Manager — ITIL standards for service management in a virtualized environment.
 
 In the interest of time only VMware products are listed above, but there are many more 3rd party vendors with solutions in these areas.
 
The benefits of the private cloud can’t make up for the fact that your standards, SLAs and processes might need some attention — the agility of the cloud will likely shed even more light on any such shortcomings. 

7 Responses to Cloud Computing and Newton’s third law

  1. Kong Li says:

    Newton’s third law of physics states that every force there is a reaction force that is equal in size but opposite in direction.

    This theory sounds very wierd to me!

    If a amateur boxer hits your face with his hand that carries 1000 pounds of weight, you should not hit him back since he would receive the same force that is equal in size but opposite in direction.

    However, in reality, when the amateur boxer hits your face with his hand that carries 1000 pounds of weight might cause your face to break and yet it causes less pain on his hand without breaking.

  2. Kong Li says:

    If somebody stands 100 meters right below an object with a weight of 1 gram and he let the object to drop hit that person, the object would hit that person and bounces out since the reaction force that is equal in size but opposite in direction that causes it to bounce back.

    What if somebody stands 100 meters right below an object with a weight of 1000 kgs and he let the object to drop to hit that person, the highest will be the reaction force in size and opposite in direction to be bounced back from his head according to the third law prinicple of Newton’s principle. Yet in reality, it does not bounce out the highest from the head and that causes that person to die.

  3. Kong Li says:

    Extracted above:

    Issac Newton’s third law of motion famously stated “to every action there is always an equal and opposite reaction”. If one takes a few liberties and applies this to a paradigm shift technology, one could say that every new technology innovation brings about new challenges.

    The conclusion that every new technology innovation brings about new challenges might not be true since it is dependent upon a number of factors as follows:

    a) Certain new tehnology innovation could only be able to bring new challenges if a country is considerably to be fully developed or developed. For example, knowledge in high technology of constructing rocket could not benefit those under-developed countries, such as, certain part of Africa and etc.

    b) Certain new technology innovation that requires to have big pull of funds in order to finance its construction. Building up rocket to some countries might not be able to afford and this new technology could not bring about new challenge to them since nothing could be benefited to them for the discovery.

    c) Certain new technology innovation that requires much space to carry out construction work of plants in order to introduce new technology innovation into the country and yet there is a limited space there to carry out. For instance, you could not expect a country likes Hongkong to build many necleur plants for the supply of electricty due to the limited vacant land over there.

    d) Certain new technology innovation could not benefit in a country in which many people oppose it. In Taiwan, people objects to have nucleur plant to be built in their country due to the Tsunami that brought about in Japan as a result of the disaster that has been brought about through the destruction of necleur plant.

  4. Nathan Jonfield says:

    Under Isaac Newton’s third law of motion, there is an equal and opposite reaction for every action.

    You might have seen those people with black-belt martial art in breaking a number of identical bricks at one goal. Initially they place all the bricks adjacent to each other and then they use either their elbow or their hand to hit the top part of the brick. Many of the bricks will break and it leaves a few of the bricks that are located in the lower part could not be breakable. According to Isaac Newton’s principle, when they hit the top brick, the second brick will receive an equal and opposite reaction and that causes the second top brick to break. As the second brick receive the momentum force and it will hit the third layer of the brick and cause it to break. And this continues and causes many bricks to break. However, there are a few bricks right below in which these people could not break and it implies that the momentum force should have been diluted or else all the bricks should have been broken up.

    Thus, there is a shortfall in Isaac Newton’s third law of motion’s principle.

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